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Latest: iWork for iCloud Updated to Support Eight New Languages, 50 New Fonts, and More

iWork for iCloud just got a little more useful today after Apple updated the software with several new features, uncluding support for eight new languages and the addition of more than 50 new fonts to the existing collection. Generally the changes...
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iWork for iCloud Updated to Support Eight New Languages, 50 New Fonts, and More

iWork for iCloud just got a little more useful today after Apple updated the software with several new features, uncluding support for eight new languages and the addition of more than 50 new fonts to the existing collection. Generally the changes affect Apple’s cloud-based productivity suite across the board, and you can find them in iWork’s cloud versions of Pages, Numbers, and Keynote.

There is a small exception; Arabic and Hebrew language support is only available on Pages, although French, German, Spanish, Chinese, Japanese, and Brazilian Portuguese can now be found across all three major apps.

Most apps are now a tad more user-friendly as well, thanks to additions such as the ability to undo the deletion of section breaks in Pages and the ability to show or hide the slide navigator in Keynote and Numbers. Other features include renaming documents within the editor itself, to drag wedges from pie charts, and to move and resize the legends for said charts.

iWork for iCloud can be accessed on all of the major browsers (Safari, Chrome, Firefox, and Internet Explorer), although it’s best to use the most recent versions of those browsers for optimal performance. All three related apps remain in beta, although you can access them all as long as you have your Apple ID and password handy.

Follow this article’s writer, Leif Johnson, on Twitter.

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The Week’s Hottest Apple News Stories, November 21

We’re getting pre-pre-Black Thursday action going on here, so we know the deals long in advance. Meanwhile, Yosemite and iOS 8 have been updated, and there’s new Apple Watch news. But what’s the latest happening in Arizona? And that Steve Jobs picture no one wants the title part for? Looks like it’s gone the way of the original click wheel iPod. 

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Judge Approves Apple’s $450 Million E-book Settlement

After months of waiting, the class action lawsuit alleging that Apple played foul with its iBooks customers by fixing the price of e-books may at least be coming to an end. Today U.S. District Court Judge Denise Cote accepted Apple’s 0 million proposal to settle the suit, although she expressed concern regarding the timing of the proposal.

According to Reuters, Judge Cote thought the document Apple submitted was an “unusually structured settlement, especially for one arrived at on the eve of trial.” Apple originally submitted the settlement back in July, after all the parties involved agreed to the 0 million sum. At the onset of the suit, the opposing lawyers had asked for 0 million.

The settlement may have been approved, but Apple still hopes to win its Dec. 15 appeal of an earlier ruling from the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York (which Cote presides over as well), which stated that the Cupertino company was culpable of working with major book publishers to inflate prices for its store.

Should Apple win the appeal (and thus be found not guilty of breaking antitrust laws), the submitted settlement could keep the Cupertino company from paying a dime to either consumers of the lawyers involved. If Apple is found guilty, however, it’ll “only” have to pay 0 million to as many as 23 million consumers. (The remaining million would go to legal fees.) Alternatively, the case could end up being retried.

Apple first got into trouble when the U.S. Department of Justice argued that the iPhone maker had used “agency model” pricing to keep suppliers from selling the same books they sold to Apple to other retailers at lower prices. The model was meant to compete with the wholesale model employed by businesses such as Amazon, which allows them to set their own prices below cost.

Follow this article’s writer, Leif Johnson, on Twitter.

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